Friday Fictioneers: Tradition

Another entry in the fine tradition of Friday Fictioneers! I had to puzzle over this week’s prompt for a while before finding an opening for another hundred-word story…as usual, please let me know what you think of it!

(And another thank-you to Rochelle Wisoff-Fields for providing the weekly prompts and keeping this herd of cats pretty well organized!)

copyright-roger-cohenTradition

Another meal, another lecture. Zach kicked at the leg of his chair. “Family tradition…musical gift…your great-grandfather…” He scooped up a forkful of mac’n’cheese and frowned at it. “And it wouldn’t even cost anything for your instrument, since Gramps left you his cello.”

Zach sat up straight. “Fine! Turn me into Gramps! Why didn’t you give me his name too – Donnaaaalld?”

“You don’t deserve it! The way he had to struggle – his family thought being a musician was childish! He had to fight them every inch of the way!”

Zach smiled to himself. Maybe he would copy Gramps after all.

* * *

And to change the subject a bit – it was great getting together in person yesterday with two other Fictioneers, Janet from Sustainabilitea and Rich!

FictioneersAtStarbucksThank you to the staff at Starbucks for letting us monopolize one of their tables for a couple of hours, and to the helpful stranger who took photos for us.

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42 responses to “Friday Fictioneers: Tradition

  1. Hi Sharon,
    Nice support group! Loved the voice of your character and his attitude. Ron

  2. Isn’t it great whenekids see the light? lovely Sharon, and how nice to meet some blogging friends!

  3. WONDERFUL photograph!

  4. The key in this story is found with sudden pleasure! I really liked the way Zach had that thought, hearing differently what was being said…!

  5. Why is it youngsters want to expand a few years differnce in time into eons where nothing can ever be the same. Don’t they relaize their life is headed to the same place? Nice original though and well done with the grandson’s honest reaction.

  6. Great story! Good characters. It’s really cool to see the pics of you folks. I hope we ALL get to see each other VERY soon.

  7. I liked how the kid stepped up. It’s neat when that happens in a youngster.

  8. Great take on the prompt Sharon, enjoyed it. There are ways to bring a child on board.

  9. I think he’s going to copy Gramps and “fight them every inch of the way!” Good story.

    Nice pic of you guys… that must have been a ball gossiping about all the Fictioneers… Of course, nothing but good about me, I’m sure.

  10. Dear Sharon,
    I loved this story. Very human…natural dialogue. We think we’ve paved the way for the next generation only to find out that we’re “old fashion”.
    I love the picture and would love to have a convention some day. That would be amazing.
    Shalom,
    Rochelle

  11. Gramps’ old instrument…I had the same thought. 🙂

  12. Great story. He’s going to raise hell isn’t he?

  13. Well done!
    I can just feel the rebellion in Zach.

    • Thank you! Yes – between his age (around sixteen, I think, a naturally rebellious time), and his parents’ approach of just giving orders about what he should do with his whole life, and the fact that he really doesn’t want to be a musician, he’s getting ready to dig his heels in and do things his own way.

  14. Ah, now sometimes it’s reverse psychology that works – I wonder if the parent doing the lecturing had that intention all along? Nicely written. 🙂

  15. Zach will pioneer the Cello in a black metal group. … Wait, it has already been done.

    That is were Zach has to go to be rebellious 🙂

    • Made me laugh! I suspect, though, that Zach’s more likely to do something deeply shocking like manage a black metal group. And some roots rockers. And the diva of the moment. Probably more money in that line of work, too.

  16. Love the tension in this.

  17. Dear Sharon,

    Loved the whole story but especially the last line. I like that kid.

    Aloha,

    Doug

  18. 1. i like how he starts to change his mind. 2. i will never look good in a picture. well done.

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